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Puerto Rican & Latina/o Studies Subject Guide — Getting Started

This guide offers you useful information on how to find and search for books, journals and other resources for Puerto Rican & Latino Studies

Puerto Rican and Latina/o Studies Research Guide

Miniature flags representing Hispanic nations line the stage during the 2012 Hispanic Heritage Month celebration at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas. Photo via Flickr/texasmilitaryforces (CC BY-ND 2.0)Welcome to my page! This online guide will help you to find materials such as books, journal articles, and films in the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary areas of Latino Studies and Puerto Rican Studies.

This guide will offer you tips and guidelines regarding how to do research in this field. Because the concepts of Hispanic, Latina/o, Latinx, Puerto Rican, DiaspoRican, Newyorikan are based on ethnicity and nationality and not race, the meaning and definition of these terms are in constant change and evolution.

You can also contact me with your questions when working on your research papers.

Tips on How to Find Sources for Your Paper

Because the concepts of Hispanic, Latina/o, Latinx, Puerto Rican, DiaspoRican, Newyorikan are based on ethnicity and nationality and not race, their meaning are in constant change and evolution. But, in term of research, what you need to be aware of is that:

 

  • The term more widely used in book catalogs and databases to organize materials in this subject is Hispanic American
  • The term Latino is not used widely for subject classification but it can be found in the title of books and articles
  • Use quotation marks to search "Hispanic American" as a phrase
  • Both terms Hispanic American and Latino/Latina are umbrella terms, meaning that they represent a wide variety of people and nationalities embedded in one term. In you want to research a particular group or nationality, consider broadening your search by using other terminology that represents the group you want to study. For example, Puerto Rican, Chicano, Mexican American, Salvadorans, etc... This is particular important when searching databases since some studies focus in one or two groups.
These tips work in any search database box, Library Search box,WorldCat or Google Scholar. Keep these tips in mind when searching online

 

Photo Caption

Photo caption/info: Miniature flags representing Hispanic nations line the stage during the 2012 Hispanic Heritage Month celebration at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas. Photo via Flickr/texasmilitaryforces (CC BY-ND 2.0). Original story: "Negotiating Hispanic and Latino Identity (Even if Neither Label Fits)" By Lucia Benavides, Sep 28, 2015, KUT 90.5, Austin's NPR station.